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How code helps singles find love this Valentine’s Day

Future Tech: Featuring a clean-burning space rocket & self-repairing sneakers.

The algorithm of this popular dating app explained

How code helps singles find love this Valentine’s Day

From Vox:

If there’s one thing I know about love, it’s that people who don’t find it have shorter lifespans on average. Which means learning how the Tinder algorithm works is a matter of life and death, extrapolating slightly.

According to the Pew Research Center, a majority of Americans now consider dating apps a good way to meet someone — the previous stigma is gone. But in February 2016, at the time of Pew’s survey, only 15 percent of American adults had actually used a dating app, which means acceptance of the tech and willingness to use the tech are disparate issues. On top of that, only 5 percent of people in marriages or committed relationships said their relationships began in an app. Which raises the question: Globally, more than 57 million people use Tinder — the biggest dating app — but do they know what they’re doing?

They do not have to answer, as we’re all doing our best. But if some information about how the Tinder algorithm works and what anyone of us can do to find love within its confines is helpful to them, then so be it.

The first step is to understand that Tinder is ranking its users competitively, with a fairly simple algorithm that can’t consider very many factors beyond appearance and location. The second step is to understand that this doesn’t mean that you’re doomed, as years of scientific research have confirmed attraction and romance as unchanging facts of human brain chemistry. The third is to take my advice, which is to listen to biological anthropologist Helen Fisher and never pursue more than nine dating app profiles at once. Here we go…

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This rocket uses a clean-burning, renewable fuel source

How code helps singles find love this Valentine’s Day

From Fast Company:

Scotland is about to enter the space race, and they are doing it in style. Orbex has just unveiled its Prime rocket, which includes the world’s largest 3D-printed rocket engine.

The rocket itself is made of a carbon fiber and aluminum composite that’s supposed to be 30 per cent lighter than any other craft in its category. Orbex says its engine is the first commercial rocket engine to be designed to work with bio-propane, a “clean-burning, 100 per cent renewable fuel source” that cuts carbon, a welcome addition to the space race. Thanks to its 3D printed design, the rocket engine may be safer, as it was uniquely manufactured in a single piece without joints or seams or welds, which could mean it is more likely to withstand extreme temperature and pressure fluctuations.

The new Prime rocket is designed to help Orbex achieve its dreams of launching a fleet of nanosatellites to altitudes of up to 776 miles. While it isn’t nearly as far along in the process as SpaceX or Blue Origin, as it hasn’t launched a rocket yet, it does already have a contract with the Swiss-based company Astrocast to launch up to 20 nanosatellites for the development of a planet-wide Internet of Things (IoT) network. It hopes to launch at least 10 nanosatellites for the company by 2023.

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These shoes can repair themselves

These shoes can repair themselves

From Engadget:

Shoes will invariably wear out with enough use, but scientists might have found a way to delay the shopping trip for their replacements. A USC team has created a self-healing 3D-printed rubber that could be ideal for footwear, tires and even soft robotics. The effort involves 3D printing the material with photopolymerization (solidifying a resin with light) while introducing an oxidizer at just the right ratio to add self-healing properties without slowing down the solidifying process.

The result is a rubber that’s highly durable but can still be made in a reasonable amount of time. An object that takes 20 minutes to make (such as a shoe sole) can survive being cut in half with a few hours of repair time. And the warmer it is, the faster the material heals. In the lab, it took two hours to fix a cut at roughly 140F.


This might not be ready for the real world in the near future. Researchers would still need to find a way to make this available for mass production. And even if it’s ready, it would be important to dial back the hype. This might prevent your shoes from cracking and minimize gouges, but it’s not going to keep your running shoes looking brand new after hundreds of trips to the gym.

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The Editors

The Editorial Team develops articles, company profiles and resources for the Business Hub to bring IT, tech and innovation stories to the Manitoba business community.

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